Bryans Gallery

Southwest Native American Arts and Jewelry in Taos since 1982

  • Paintings
  • "Butterfly Painting" by Silvester Hustito

"Butterfly Painting" by Silvester Hustito

1,800.00
SHbones1.jpg
SHbones1.jpg

"Butterfly Painting" by Silvester Hustito

1,800.00

Acrylic painting on masonite mounted on wood by Zuni Artist Silvester Hustito.  The background of this painting is metallic silver acrylic and some of the butterflies are raised, giving the piece a three dimensional effect.

Approx:: 25" x 25". Price includes Crating and Shipping within the continental US.

 

 

More Info

Add To Cart

Acrylic painting on masonite mounted on wood by Zuni Artist Silvester Hustito.  The background of this painting is metallic silver acrylic and some of the butterflies are raised, giving the piece a three dimensional effect.

Approx:: 25" x 25". Price includes Crating and Shipping within the continental US.

 

 

 

Silvester Hustito  

Cutting-edge Zuni Artist, Silvester Hustito, was immersed in art since he was a child, as he watched his  family create beautiful things everyday. This environment  encouraged him, at a young age, to play with different materials, whether it was a pile of mud or his mother’s left-over silver scraps and turquoise. Silvester received his first award, at age nine, when he entered a Heard Museum competition. He won first place and the museum purchased his piece for their permanent collection. Since then, he has lived in different cities around the country, exploring museums and galleries. This exposure to some of the most influential contemporary artists in the world has motivated him to work in many different styles. He is seen as a contemporary artist because he experiments with new materials and ideas. His work has been in the National Museum of the American Indian, the Heard Museum, and in private collections around the world.

I feel that being a contemporary artist gives me the freedom to create without limiting my ideas and abilities. My inspiration has been the fine line work of the late Helen Hardin, and the cartoonish figures of Jeff Koons.  --Silvester Hustito