Bryans Gallery

Southwest Native American Arts and Jewelry in Taos since 1982

  • Pottery
  • Wedding Vase by Angie Yazzie

Wedding Vase by Angie Yazzie

630.00
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Wedding Vase by Angie Yazzie

630.00

Taos Pueblo micaceous clay wedding vase with braided handle, traditionally pit-fired; hand-coiled, expertly crafted by master potter Angie Yazzie.  

Approx: 8.25" x 7" x 6".

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Taos Pueblo micaceous clay wedding vase with braided handle, traditionally pit-fired; hand-coiled, expertly crafted by master potter Angie Yazzie.  

Approx: 8.25" x 7" x 6".

Angie Yazzie

Angie Yazzie was born on June 16, 1965 in Taos, New Mexico. She is a member of the Taos Pueblo Tribe and has lived in Taos all her life. Her mother, Mary Archuleta, is of Taos Pueblo and her father, Nick Yazzie, was a Navajo from Ganado, Arizona. Primarily a self-taught potter, she was introduced at an early age to traditional pottery techniques by her mother and maternal grandmother, Isabel C. Archuleta. As a child, Angie was fortunate to live a few years with her maternal grandparents and was exposed to many different types of crafts through the shop the owned a Taos Pueblo.Angie's work is recognized for the thinness of the walls and the variety of shapes. Her work has been exhibited at the Wheelwright Museum in Santa Fe, the Millicent Rogers Museum in Taos, the Permanent Collection at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe and the Cincinnati Museum in Ohio.In November of 1994 Angie was invited, along with nine other potters considered to be micaceous masters, to the convocation at the School of American Research. The results of the convocation led to a book entitled "All That Glitters" and eventually an annual micaceous show.

The Story of the Wedding Vase — as told by Margaret Gutierrez, Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico

Usually a week or two before a couple is married by a priest, the future husband’s parents make the Wedding Vase.When the vase has been made, the groom along with his parents and all his relatives go to the bride’s house. The bride brings out everything she will need to establish their new home together: clothing, utensils, mattress, moccasins, corn and any other homemaking essentials including her white manta wedding dress. The parents of both the bride and groom give the young couple advice to help them have a happy and successful marriage.

Indian holy water is placed in the wedding vase, and the vase is turned around and given to the bride. She drinks from one side of the vase, turns it around again, and gives it to the groom who then drinks from the opposite side. This ceremony unites them as one.The couple will treasure the vase throughout their marred like. Should one of them outlive the other, the remaining person will give the vase to a couple know to be living a happily marred life.The wedding vase is a treasured and protected always — it is never broken, discarded or destroyed.