Bryans Gallery

Southwest Native American Arts and Jewelry in Taos since 1982

  • Pottery
  • Santa Clara Red Ware Pot by Minnie Vigil

Santa Clara Red Ware Pot by Minnie Vigil

310.00
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Santa Clara Red Ware Pot by Minnie Vigil

310.00

Small, hand-painted and hand-coiled Santa Clara redware pot by Minnie Vigil, with long unpolished buff neck.  

Approx: 4.75" x 3.5"

 

 

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Small, hand-painted and hand-coiled Santa Clara redware pot by Minnie Vigil, with long unpolished buff neck.  

Approx: 4.75" x 3.5"

 

 

Minnie Vigil

"Born in 1931 of mixed Santa Clara and Pojoaque heritage as Maria D. Vigil...Minnie grew up learning the fundamentals of the traditional way of making pottery from her mother, Petra Montoya Gutierrez. She began making pottery in 1955 and won her first award at the Santa Fe Indian Market in 1975.Minnie specializes in polychrome wares, some slipped in red clay and stone polished, some slipped in matte tan clay and not polished.Minnie typically signs her pieces as Minnie, Santa Clara." - The Eyes of the Pot

Santa Clara Red Ware

Most pottery at Santa Clara Pueblo today is still fired outdoors in traditional pit fires. The clay for both red and black ware is the same, with the firing process determining if the finished pottery will be red or black. Pottery is placed in a metal container that has air holes, and a fire is built up around it. Toward the end of the firing process, which can take a few hours time, pieces are given their jet black color through the smothering of the outdoor fire. Manure, metal and other materials are used to cover the fire and block all air passage, thus oxidizing the pottery. For red ware, the fire is not smothered, allowing air to pass through and the pottery retains its red color