Bryans Gallery

Southwest Native American Arts and Jewelry in Taos since 1982

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  • Micaceous Rectangle Pot with Fire Clouds by Angie Yazzie

Micaceous Rectangle Pot with Fire Clouds by Angie Yazzie

775.00
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Micaceous Rectangle Pot with Fire Clouds by Angie Yazzie

775.00

Taos Pueblo rectangular pot, by award winning artist Angie Yazzie: thin-walled, hand-coiled, pit-fired micaceous clay. Angie hand-coils her rectangle shaped pots, which she describes as an extremely painstaking and difficult process.

Approx: 2 1/2" x 10 1/2" x 8 3/4"



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Taos Pueblo rectangular pot, by award winning artist Angie Yazzie: thin-walled, hand-coiled, pit-fired micaceous clay. Angie hand-coils her rectangle shaped pots, which she describes as an extremely painstaking and difficult process.

Approx: 2 1/2" x 10 1/2" x 8 3/4"



Angie Yazzie

Angie Yazzie was born on June 16, 1965 in Taos, New Mexico. She is a member of the Taos Pueblo Tribe and has lived in Taos all her life. Her mother, Mary Archuleta, is of Taos Pueblo and her father, Nick Yazzie, was a Navajo from Ganado, Arizona. Primarily a self-taught potter, she was introduced at an early age to traditional pottery techniques by her mother and maternal grandmother, Isabel C. Archuleta. As a child, Angie was fortunate to live a few years with her maternal grandparents and was exposed to many different types of crafts through the shop the owned a Taos Pueblo.Angie's work is recognized for the thinness of the walls and the variety of shapes. Her work has been exhibited at the Wheelwright Museum in Santa Fe, the Millicent Rogers Museum in Taos, the Permanent Collection at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe and the Cincinnati Museum in Ohio.In November of 1994 Angie was invited, along with nine other potters considered to be micaceous masters, to the convocation at the School of American Research. The results of the convocation led to a book entitled "All That Glitters" and eventually an annual micaceous show.

AWARDS & PRESENTATIONS

Eight Northern Pueblo Show:
2008 — 1st place, Micaceous Pottery
2007 — 2nd place, Micaceous Pottery
2006 — 1st place, Best of Traditional Pottery
2005 — 2nd place, Unpainted Pottery
2003 — 1st and 2nd places, Unpainted Pottery
2001 — 1st, 2nd and 3rd places, Unpainted Pottery
2000 — 1st and 3rd places, Unpainted Pottery

Taos Invitational:
2004 — Best in Pottery
2001 — Best of Show
2000 — Best of Pottery

Taos Art Museum:
2000 — Best in Unpainted Pottery Division

Taos Invites Taos:
1996 — Best of Pottery

Santa Fe Indian Market:
2007 — 2nd Place Traditional Pottery
2006 — 3rd Place Traditional Pottery
2005 — Best in Division,
1st Place Traditional Pottery
1st Place Other Forms of Pottery
2003 — 1st Place Traditional Pottery
2nd Place Other Forms Pottery
2002 — Best in Division,
1st & 3rd Places Unpainted Pottery
1st Place Other Forms of Pottery
2001 — 2nd Place Unpainted Division Pottery
2000 — 1st Place Non-Traditional/Micaceous Pottery
1999 — 1st Place Traditional Pottery
2nd Place Non-Traditional Pottery
1998 — 1st and 2nd Places Micaceous Pottery
1996 — 2nd and 3rd Places Traditional Pottery 

Museum of Women in the Arts:
2015 — Panel of women artists