Bryans Gallery

Southwest Native American Arts and Jewelry in Taos since 1982

Double Corn Maiden by Faye Quandelacy

815.00
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Double Corn Maiden by Faye Quandelacy

815.00

Zuni fetish by master carver, Faye Quandelacy, twin double-sided corn maiden carved from turquoise and inlaid with red coral, purchased new from the artist circa 2000. 

Approx: 1.575" x 1" x .5"

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Zuni fetish by master carver, Faye Quandelacy, twin double-sided corn maiden carved from turquoise and inlaid with red coral, purchased new from the artist circa 2000. 

Approx: 1.575" x 1" x .5"

Faye Quandelacy

Faye Quandelacy, daughter of the famed Ellen and Dixie Quandelacy, is one of the most recognized and collected Zuni fetish carvers, along with her brothers and sisters (Andres, Avery,  Sandra, Dickie, Stewart and Georgia). She is a graduate of the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe and is known world wide as an accomplished carver. Faye often carves the three stages of womanhood: the Maiden, the Mother, and the Wise Elder.

Corn Maidens

Corn Maidens, sometimes called the Grandmother of Light or Grandmother of the Sun, represent supernatural beings that gave the gift of corn to the Zuni people. According to Zuni mythology, the Corn Maidens emerged from the Middle World at the same time as the Zuni people. Legends vary at this point, but one story tells of insults and harassment that caused the Corn Maidens to leave the people, taking the village corn. With the Zuni people on the brink of starvation, Paytuma went into the Summer Lands with his painted flute, seeking the Corn Maidens. He found them and greeted them with the music of his song.  As the Maidens greeted him, with a touch of his hand and the breath of his flute, he persuaded the Maidens to follow him back to their deserted people.